Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Tupi.html
Home | portuguese language | basque language | Esperanto language | czeck language | languages | balinese, japavanese, tetum | tetum | okinawan language | vietnamese language | welch language | swiss german language | luxambourgish language | romanian language | vietnamese language | french language | other languages | Talk greek | maori language | hawaiian | hawaiian language and its history | learn hawaiian | Ainu | Balinese | Nhengatu | guarani | greelandic language | shona language | kimbundo language | Tok Pisin language | Hiri motu language | yucatec language | sesotho language | zulu language | ndebele language | apache language | cheyenne language | dakota language | cochimi language | quechua language | afrikaans language | eton language | jamaican patois language | luganda language | ibo language | yoruba language | hausa language | luvale language | malagasy language | LANGUAGE DICTIONARIES | sepedi language | somali language | icelandic language | faroese language | cornish language | maltese language | armenian language | swahili language | wolof language | yoruba language | albanian language | asturian language | basque language | breton language | galician language | gallo language | romani language | karelian language | ladino language | mingo language | navajo language | amuzgo language | Favorite Links | New Page Title
guarani

Enter subhead content here

 

Buscador Mbareté

Forum Tereré Jeré · Chat · Juegos · Postales · Clasificados · Publicá tus artículos
  Noticias de PY · Las Refrescantes · Farándula · Poemas · MP3 ·
Historia del Paraguay ·
 www.terere.com.py  > PARAGUAY FOR YOU > Guaraní Legacy

 Guarani Legacy
THE LANGUAGE
- Learn Guaraní On-line
- Alphabet
- Facts about the language
- Greetings and expressions
- More expressions
- Guaraní Phonemes
MYTHOLOGY AND RELIGION
- Creation Theory
- Guarani Mythology
LITERATURE
-
Human Rights Declaration

This page is being
updated periodically...

You will have more
and better information
soon !!!


 Paraguay 4 U
- Country Profile
- History of Paraguay
- Guarani Legacy
- Music and Arts
- Paraguayan Food
- Craftsmanship
- Destinations
- Sports
- Paraguay on Internet
- Who is Who - PY
- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Facts about the Guarani language

This information comes from the Guarani Phonology booklet from the Institue of Guarani Linguistics of Paraguay.

The origin of the Guarani language has given way to many theories that look for its primary trunk. Even today its roots are unknown. Nevertheless, we can say that is was born among the Guarani people who, according to one theory, came from Polynesia, or more exactly, from Australian and Mongoloid contingents which, after entering America through the Bering strait, seated themselves in these lands. [gram: the Paraguayan lands]

As to the origin of the word "Guarani", etymologically it is derived from the word "Guarini;" which means "frontal war", and by extension, "warrior".

Geographic Location

The Guarani language, in its hegemonic period, before the Discovery, extended in the America from the Caribbean to the north, to the Amazon in the middle, and to the Rio de la Plata at the south. The Guarani language was spoken by various tribes, among whom its worth mentioning:

Carios
who lived the the immediate area around Asuncion.
Itatines
to the north of Paraguay and south of Matto Grosso.
Omaguas
beyond the banks of the Amazon river, in Brazil
Chiriguanos
in the immediate area near the Andes, in Bolivia.
Chiripas
in the region of Guaira
Tupinamba
in the middle of the Atlantic region of Brazil. They are better-known as the Tupi)
Karaíves
to the north of Brazil in the Caribbean islands.
Guasurangos and Guarayos
who were the Guarani-related tribes near the border between Paraguay and Brazil

These tribes did not have well-defined geographic locations, owing to their nomadic conditions. They were nomadic because of the wars that obligated them to move constantly. They also moved when a chief died.

Currently, in regards to Paraguayan territory, we find the following Guarani groups that still speak the language: Chiriguanos and Tapiete (in the Chaco), Paî Tavyterã, Ava Katuete or Ava Chiripa, Mbya and Ache Guayaki (in the Eastern region).



Sobre este sitio · Publicidad · Contacte con Tereré
Copyright 1999 ®  by terere.com.py - Todos los derechos reservados - Asunción Paraguay


 

Buscador Mbareté

Forum Tereré Jeré · Chat · Juegos · Postales · Clasificados · Publicá tus artículos
  Noticias de PY · Las Refrescantes · Farándula · Poemas · MP3 ·
Historia del Paraguay ·
 www.terere.com.py  > PARAGUAY FOR YOU > Guaraní Legacy

 Guarani Legacy
THE LANGUAGE
- Learn Guaraní On-line
- Alphabet
- Facts about the language
- Greetings and expressions
- More expressions
- Guaraní Phonemes
MYTHOLOGY AND RELIGION
- Creation Theory
- Guarani Mythology
LITERATURE
-
Human Rights Declaration

This page is being
updated periodically...

You will have more
and better information
soon !!!


 Paraguay 4 U
- Country Profile
- History of Paraguay
- Guarani Legacy
- Music and Arts
- Paraguayan Food
- Craftsmanship
- Destinations
- Sports
- Paraguay on Internet
- Who is Who - PY
- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Learn Guarani On-line

 There's no doubt about it --- the only way to learn a language to the point at which you are fluent is to be immersed in a population that speaks that language. You have to be in a situation in which you must speak the language. But to make the learning process go smoother, it's most practical to understand the formal rules of the language and be familiar with examples of the language before plunging into a foreign society. This knowledge acts like crutches to help to maneuver in the native-speaking population; you'll eventually be able to "walk" on your own and throw away the crutches.

These on-line documents are meant to help anyone interested in learning Guarani. Are you a linguist who must learn a bit of Guarani? Will you soon be going to Paraguay as a Peace Corps volunteer? This on-line course is meant to help you in your efforts.

The Coursework

The material in this "course" is organized in a manner similar to a first-year textbook for any foreign language. Each chapter begins with a mini-dialogue, then an analysis of the new structures in the mini-dialogue. Those new structures are extended, hopefully in a challenging way, as the chapter progresses.

All the dialogues and examples of Guarani speech are presented with three translations:

The guarani text is in a bold font.
Linguistic morphemes in English are in a typewriter font.
Spanish is presented on the third line.
English is on the last line.

Of course, for those who use lynx, the font will not change very much. :-)

The Guarani 101 on-line course exists in two different versions, one in Spanish and one in English. But the Guarani examples are the same in both. That is, both versions of Guarani 101 include the morphemic, Spanish, and English translations for each Guarani example. Many linguists who study Guarani know both Spanish and English, so I thought that having translations of the Guarani in both Spanish and English would help the student. The only difference between the Spanish and English courses is the text between the Guarani examples.

Guarani 101

For those of you not familiar with the method of naming courses in the United States, a course number in the 100-series usually indicates a first-year course. "101" means that the class is the first-level class in the first-year course.

Pronunciation & Orthography

You should begin studying Guarani by becoming familiar with Pronunciation & Orthography, especially since Guarani orthography does not fit into the ISO Latin 1 scheme of things. I had to use some workarounds to make Guarani examples readable by all web-browsers and and still maintain truthfulness to their orthography and pronunciation.

Guarani Culture

This information comes from Paraguay: Land of Lace and Legend, Chapter 1, page 22.

In the fertile, wooded, eastern region of Paraguay lived numerous tribes of the Guarani-speaking Indians who inhabited much of the southeastern part of the continent. Semi-nomadic warriors, they had no wheel, plow, draft animals, or metals. They used bone, wood and thorns for tools and weapons. While living largely on fish and game, they also practiced a shifting agriculture, growing maize (avati) and mandioca (mandi'o) on different plots from one season to another.

Forest in Paraguay

The Guaranis were a people of the forest and their word for Paradise or heaven was Yvága, which means "a place of abundant fruit trees." Their language, which was largely onomatopoeic in origin, still preserves the sounds of the forest. Their religious mythology allowed them to live in harmony with the prolific plant and animal life around them. It is said that they named 1,100 species of plants and knew their medicinal properties. Their prinicipal god was Tupang, or Tupâ, a pure, formless spirit which lived in and animated the whole universe. Tupâ was not capable of doing evil. Only one of the Guarani gods was evil. All the others were protectors of nature. Also, the actions of Tupang indicated that life on this earth was not final. Therefore, when the Christian missionaries came, the Guarani had little trouble in combining the two religions.

The word Guarani means "warrior." Like modern Paraguayans, the Guaranis are friendly and hospitable, but fierce and stubborn in battle. Some Guarani tribes had fought the Guaycurus of the Chaco and pressed on to the edges of the Inca kingdom, coveting its riches long before the white man came.



Sobre este sitio · Publicidad · Contacte con Tereré
Copyright 1999 ®  by terere.com.py - Todos los derechos reservados - Asunción Paraguay




Enter supporting content here